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Save Time and Money with These Top Spray Booth Accessories

If you want to get the maximum use out of your paint booth, consider investing in some upgrades. Accessories such as all-in-one control panels, LED lights, and AMUs improve your booth’s efficiency and performance, and special coatings simplify cleaning. Learn more about how to save money with the right accessories for your spray booth.

Mixing Rooms

It may seem easy to just store your paints, primers, glazes, and other chemicals in the corner of your shop, but keeping these things in the open presents a fire hazard. And it’s difficult to clean up accidental spills all over your shop’s floor.

With a well-built mixing booth, you have a dedicated and safe place to store your paints and stains. All of our mixing rooms are ETL-certified and compliant with NFPA standards. Built-in ventilation systems run continuously, removing the fumes and harmful particles created by mixing and storing paint and other chemicals.

Energy-Efficient LED Lights

Your paint booth probably has lights already, but built-in illumination isn’t always optimal, especially for finishing jobs that require a lot of precision. When you upgrade your booth to energy-efficient LED flat-panel lights. The LED lay-in panels are slim and easy to install, and are suitable for both heated and unheated booths. LED panels drastically reduce energy use, costing you less money on each power bill. Additionally, they last for an extremely long time and come with a five-year warranty.  Our panels have up to 60,000 hours of run time, which equates to over 6 years (if you left them on 24/7). Another great benefit is that your energy company may give you a credit for upgrading to LED so the upgrade isn’t as costly as you think.

Air Makeup Units (AMU)

To keep the proper air pressure in your paint booth, you need to replace the air that gets exhausted during operation. The easiest way to do this is with an air makeup unit (AMU), which balances air pressure inside the booth by automatically providing the right amount of replacement air.

Installing an AMU is a better, more-efficient solution for air pressure management than trying to use the HVAC system to regulate the air pressure in the shop. Plus, AMUs are heated, so there are even more benefits:

  • Faster finish times
  • Temperature control for even curing
  • Fewer airborne particles and contaminants inside the booth

A heated AMU can be one of the most cost-effective upgrades for your paint booth.

Air Hose Storage Solutions

Air hoses that are left can be a tripping hazard. Easily keep your air lines stored in reels to your air hoses from getting tangled or tripped on during operation. Many air line reels can be installed anywhere, and come with automatic retraction systems that prevent the hose from becoming loose or unrolling.

Easy-To-Clean Coatings

To keep your spray booth functioning properly, it’s essential to clean the overspray that gets on the ceiling, walls, and floors. This can be a tedious job, but there are several accessories that can make it easier. White Out coating is a water-based spray that creates a film that covers paint booth walls, restoring a “like new” appearance even in booths with extensive overspray. The new white walls improve light quality in the booth. When the film gets covered with overspray, you can simply peel it off and respray the White Out on your booth’s interior.

It’s vital to keep the air inside the booth as clean as possible to reduce dust and debris that can ruin the quality of a finish. This adds to the life of your paint booth filters and keeps your paint booth fan clean. The Grippy Mat is a floor mat that traps dirt, dust, and overspray, reducing the chance that these particles will enter the airflow inside the booth. Our starter bundle includes a Grippy Mat floor covering, particle control solution, and an easy-to-use sprayer.

Operational controls

A paint booth control panel simplifies operation, allowing you to manage your booth’s lights, exhaust fans, and other crucial hardware from one point of contact. All of our ETL-certified spray booths come with electric control panels. If you purchase an uncertified booth model, you can upgrade to one of our ETL-listed control boxes; we have both single-phase and three-phase models.

Optimize Your Paint Booth with Key Accessories

If you want to make it easier to operate, monitor, and clean your paint booth, consider upgrading it with some accessories. We carry a wide range of top-quality options, and you can count on our team for advice about which upgrades are best for your booth and shop. If you have any questions about choosing the right lights, AMU, or control panel for your booth, contact our friendly sales team. We’ll provide expert solutions completely customized for your needs.

What to Do If Your Paint Booth Isn’t Code Compliant

Compliance is one of the most complex issues that you may deal with as a paint booth owner. There are both local and national regulations that apply to the installation and operation of your spray booth. Making sure your booth is compliant isn’t just about avoiding fines and legal issues. Codes are designed to ensure you operate your booth safely and correctly. By following the relevant codes, you can enhance quality control and protect yourself and your employees.

Ideally, it’s best to have a thorough understanding of all the relevant code requirements before you purchase a new paint booth. However, even the most conscientious paint booth owners may find themselves with compliance issues at some point. Read on to learn how to bring your paint booth into compliance.

Understand the Requirements

There are both national and state-level codes that apply to paint booths. The federal requirements come from several different agencies:

  • Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) rules are related to workplace safety. OSHA laws for paint booths are designed to protect operators from hazardous and combustible substances (such as paints and other finishing products). There are rules about ventilation, filters, illumination, and ignition sources.
  • National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) codes are designed to mitigate the fire risks of spraying flammable materials. NFPA-33 specifically, is intended for fire control for large-scale, indoor spray paint applications such as industrial spray paint booths. This code covers fire prevention, fire suppression measures, cleaning of built-up overspray, and disposal of flammable materials.
  • Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards help reduce harm to the environment from volatile organic compounds that come from improper ventilation and/or disposal of toxic substances. There are filter codes, ventilation standards, and record-keeping requirements.

Your paint booth may also be subject to additional rules based on local ordinances. When you are pulling permits for your paint booth, carefully read through all the building codes so you understand them. You may need to choose an ETL-certified booth and/or have your setup checked by a local inspector.

Even if your paint booth is already installed, it may become noncompliant if you change the layout of your shop, disassemble and reassemble the booth, or start using different types of finishing products. Local codes can also change, requiring you to take certain actions to make your spray booth compliant again.

Mitigate Fire Risks

Local fire codes may be stricter than NFPA regulations. If your booth doesn’t meet fire safety standards, you may need to make some changes:

  • Replace clogged filters and clean out overspray buildup in the booth.
  • Install fire extinguishers, automatic sprinklers, and other fire suppression equipment as directed by the city or county fire chief.
  • Identify all ignition sources and move them away from the booth. Common sources of ignition are light fixtures, switches and certain types of fans. Make sure to store and mix paints and finishes away from spark-producing devices, ideally in a paint mixing booth.

Your paint booth itself should meet national fire safety requirements by including non-sparking fans and lights. However, taking extra fire precautions can help protect everyone in your shop.

Schedule a Field Test

Some states and cities only allow paint booths that have ETL certification. This Electrical Testing Laboratories mark indicates that the booth’s components meet certain NFPA safety requirements. In an ETL-listed booth, the electrical control panel for the lights and fans is designed to meet UL standards.

If your local codes require ETL certification, the easiest way to ensure compliance is to purchase an ETL-listed booth. You can also obtain certification for an existing booth by scheduling an official inspection and completing any required changes. However, this can be a costly certification process. If you are unsure if it will be required, it is best to purchase a booth that is already certified.

Prioritize Regular Maintenance

Once your paint booth is compliant with all relevant codes and standards, preventative maintenance is the best thing you can do to keep it that way.

  • Change filters when necessary.
  • Clean the booth regularly.
  • Check wires for wear and tear.
  • Monitor airflow and ventilation.
  • Inspect fire suppression equipment frequently.
  • Clean any overspray from the exhaust fans

If you’re not sure how to maintain your paint booth, contact an expert.

Get Reliable Support To Keep Your Booth Compliant

Paint booth compliance is about more than just following building codes; a compliant booth is safer to operate. If your booth isn’t code compliant, the best thing to do is remedy the situation right away by scheduling an inspection and completing any assigned action items. When you are purchasing a paint booth, make sure to choose one that meets federal standards and is ETL-certified (if your local codes require it). To learn more about paint booth compliance, contact our experienced team.

Paint Booths for Wood Finishing: What You Need to Know

While most spray booths operate in similar ways, there are some characteristics that make certain models better for specific tasks. Woodworking spray booths are specifically designed to enhance the finishing process for wood items, including furniture and art pieces. These specialized spray booths offer many advantages, making the finishing process better, safer, and more efficient.

Spray Booths and Wood Finishing

In general, a paint booth provides a place to apply finishes to three-dimensional objects. In the field of woodworking, different projects may require unique finishes and coatings:

  • Stain
  • Paint
  • Sealer
  • Primer
  • Glaze
  • Powder coating (for MDF)
  • Lacquer
  • Varnish

Woodworking paint booths are designed to make it easier to finish wood items, improving the final appearance and condition.

Benefits of a Woodworking Spray Booth

A paint booth provides a favorable environment for the wood-finishing process. There are several advantages a specialized spray booth provides in a woodworking shop:

  • Better lighting, which can allow the operator to identify and fix issues with the finish
  • Proper ventilation, which can improve the overall air quality in the shop
  • Upgraded safety measures, which can help mitigate fire risks
  • Filtered exhaust mechanisms, which can reduce overspray and air pressure problems

Finishing furniture and other wood products is safer and faster with a paint booth that’s customized for woodworking.

Types of Woodworking Paint Booths

Spray booths for wood finishing are available in different configurations, but there are two styles that are the most common: enclosed and open face. Each type has unique benefits and challenges that render it better for certain shops and projects.

Enclosed Paint Booths

In general, enclosed spray booths take up more space in a shop than open face models. You must allow space for all four sides of the booth plus additional room for the doors to open. Enclosed paint booths also tend to be more expensive. However, this design makes it far easier to reduce contaminants that can degrade the quality of the finish. With an enclosed booth, it can be easier to control the air pressure and the airflow style and, in turn, the finish quality.

Open Face Paint Booths

As the name implies, an open face spray booth usually has three walls and a ceiling, with the fourth side being open to the rest of the shop. This style is generally more affordable than an enclosed model and may take up less floor space. Some open face booths are wider than they are deep (the opposite of many enclosed models), which may be better for some woodworking projects such as finishing cabinet doors. However, the open nature of this type of spray booth makes is more difficult to eliminate the contaminants that can negatively affect the finish.

Considerations When Choosing a Paint Booth

When you’re ready to upgrade the functionality of your woodworking shop with a spray booth, there are several things to consider. As discussed above, one of the most important aspects to decide on is whether you want an open face or enclosed model. There are other essential factors:

  • Size
  • Exhaust infrastructure
  • Fans and ductwork
  • ETL certification

The specifications of your shop may limit your options to booths of a specific size and/or exhaust structure. Your local laws may require you to purchase an ETL-certified model, or you may choose to do so for the added safety benefits.

Upgrade Your Shop with a Woodworking Spray Booth

The right paint booth can simplify the finishing process for countless types of wood items. Whether you are making wood furniture or crafting wood art pieces, you can count on a gorgeous finish when you use a specialized woodworking spray booth.

We offer a variety of spray booths designed for wood finishing, including both open face and enclosed models. ETL-listed booths are available, and we can also develop and manufacture a customized solution based on your unique requirements. Contact our team to learn more about our woodworking paint booth options.

ETL Certification: What Is It and Why Is It Important?

When you are choosing a paint booth, one thing you need to consider is ETL certification. Spray booths with this certification have been rigorously tested and verified to comply with certain safety codes. Some state and local regulations may require you to install an ETL-certified model. The ETL Mark can give you peace of mind that your paint booth meets the highest safety standards and won’t give you any issues with local authorities.

ETL Certification and OSHA

ETL stands for Electrical Testing Laboratories, and it’s an organization that tests the safety of products and electronic components based on a set of rigid standards. While this company has been around for over 100 years (it was started by Thomas Edison), it now functions as a division of Intertek Testing Laboratories. Intertek ETL is a Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory acknowledged by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

Paint Booth Compliance with Safety Codes

Intertek tests products based on North American safety standards and applies the ETL Mark to products and components that meet compliance requirements. One relevant safety code for paint booths is NFPA-33, which is the National Fire Protection Association’s standard for spray application using flammable or combustible materials. An ETL Mark on a paint booth indicates that Intertek finds it in compliance with NFPA-33 standards.

Another element of ETL testing for a paint booth covers the electrical control panel that operates the fans and lights. The relevant safety codes for a control panel are C 22.2 No. 14 and UL-508A. At Standard Tools and Equipment, we are an authorized ETL shop by Intertek for all the control panels we manufacture. We affix the ETL mark to these components prior to shipping them out to you.

Government Requirements and ETL-Listed Paint Booths

There are many advantages to purchasing an ETL-listed paint booth, and you may decide that you want these benefits in your shop. In some cases, however, you may not have a choice; certain state or federal laws may require you to get an ETL-listed booth. There may also be local ordinances or fire codes that necessitate you choosing ETL-listed equipment for your shop.

In general, you may need an ETL-listed paint booth if your shop is in a large city or a state with high safety standards (e.g. WA, CA, OR, MN, RI, CT, MA, and NY). Most government facilities require ETL-listed equipment. Before ordering a paint booth, it’s best to contact your local authorities for information on certification requirements.

Obtaining the ETL Mark for a Paint Booth

There are two ways to obtain an ETL mark for your paint booth: purchase an ETL-listed model or schedule an Intertek inspection and certification after you install an uncertified spray booth. Getting the ETL mark upon purchase can save you a significant amount of time and money.

Standard Tools and Equipment offers several ETL-listed models that include the following:

  • An air valve solenoid that interlocks the spray equipment and the fan motor
  • An electrical control panel that is ETL-listed
  • An official ETL certification label on the booth

Having the ETL mark on your paint booth can show your clients, employees, and local authorities that you value safety and have taken the necessary precautions.

Selecting the Right ETL-Listed Paint Booth

Whether your local laws require you to get an ETL-listed booth or you simply want the confidence that comes with knowing your booth meets the standards, we can help you choose the right certified paint booth. We have a wide range of ETL-listed models, including semidown, cross flow, and open face options. You can also choose an ETL-listed booth that includes a heated AMU for more control over the finishing process. When you order a booth from Standard Tools that has been certified, it is included in the listed booth’s price. Purchasing an ETL-listed booth is far more cost-efficient than requesting a certification inspection after installation should you need it. Our diverse selection of paint booths makes it easy to find the right model for your needs. For additional information on the ETL certification or assistance in choosing a paint booth, contact our team at 888-312-7488.

Expert Troubleshooting Solutions for Malfunctioning Fans and Motors

Following proper operation protocols and performing preventative maintenance regularly can help keep your paint booth in good working order. However, sometimes fans and motors develop issues due to age and general wear and tear. The environment of your shop can also affect your paint booth’s longevity.

If you notice signs that something is wrong with your paint booth, it’s essential to locate and repair the problem as soon as possible. Read on to learn about some of the most common problems with fans and motors and to find helpful troubleshooting tips. If you are ever unsure about any aspect of paint booth operation or maintenance, contact us for assistance.

Common Problems

As in many machines, the moving parts within a paint booth are more likely to develop issues than the stationary elements. Because the fan and motor both operate whenever the spray booth is running, even minor problems can quickly escalate.

There are several signs that may indicate a problem with your paint booth’s filter, motor, or fan:

  • Excessive overspray
  • Loud operation
  • Strong odors
  • Air pressure imbalances
  • Overheating
  • Reduced exhaust airflow

Some paint booth malfunctions can cause problems in your shop’s atmosphere, which can negatively affect your personnel. Take immediate action to stop operation and troubleshoot your paint booth if your employees develop any of the following symptoms:

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Lightheadedness
  • Chest pain
  • Nausea
  • Blurred vision

Once you realize there is a problem with your paint booth’s fan or motor, there are several steps you can take to find and repair the issue.

Filters

One of the most common problems that can affect the operation of a paint booth is a clogged air filter. The filters in your paint booth are integral to safe and effective operation, and when they become clogged with overspray or dust, air can’t move through as easily. This increases the load on the exhaust fan, which must work harder to pull used air out of the booth. Continuing to operate the paint booth under these conditions can hasten the failure of many mechanical parts due to increased wear and tear.

If it seems like your exhaust fan is operating outside of its normal conditions, a good first step is to check the air filters. With a manometer installed in your paint booth, it’s easy to see the status of the filters. Another indication of a clogged filter is a strong odor of chemicals or paint, especially if the smell is noticeable far away from the booth.

If you find that your filters are filled with overspray, replace them. You can help the air filters last longer by consistently cleaning the other elements of the paint booth: ducts, fan blades, and housing.

Fans

Like any mechanical part, a paint booth fan benefits from regular maintenance. Refer to the documentation for your equipment to find out how to maintain the fan. Even with consistent maintenance, however, the fan blades will eventually wear out.

A sure sign of a problem with your fan is that it is rotating too slowly. It can be hard to judge the fan’s air speed visually, but you can compare the reading from an anemometer to the operating specs outlined in your owner’s manual. If the fan isn’t spinning fast enough, it could point to worn-out blades and/or a clogged air filter.

You can inspect the blades themselves to see if they look worn down or broken. If so, it’s time to sharpen or replace them. Sometimes, it’s more cost-effective to replace the fan itself.

Motors

Even a small problem with the motor can prevent proper operation of your paint booth. You can reduce the risk of a motor malfunction by following the manufacturer’s recommended maintenance tasks.

If you do suspect there is a problem with your paint booth’s motor, there are a few things to do:

  • Check all the seals and fix any cracks or leaks
  • Inspect the motor belts for damage and replace them if necessary
  • Ensure that the belts are maintaining the correct tension
  • Check ALL wiring connections

In some cases, you may have to install a new motor in your paint booth. Our team can help you determine which motor you need.

Maintaining Your Paint Booth’s Motors and Fans

Preventative maintenance can help your paint booth operate at peak performance. When you do notice issues, however, follow several troubleshooting steps:

  • Check and replace air filters
  • Fix motor seals and belts
  • Replace worn out fan blades

We carry high-quality replacement parts and can answer your questions if you aren’t sure which parts are correct for your paint booth. If you are still having problems after completing these steps, contact us for advice on how to get your paint booth back up and running.

Rules and Regulations: What You Need To Do Before Purchasing a Paint Booth

Adding a paint booth to your shop can upgrade the functionality of the entire space, significantly increasing your productivity. There are various types of paint booths available from Standard Tools, so you’ll want to compare the features and costs of several models before choosing the one that’s best for your shop. You may even decide to customize your paint booth by adding a heated air make-up unit or extra lights.

Before you purchase your paint booth, however, it is imperative to make sure you create a safe environment in your shop that meets applicable regulations and ensures the spray booth can function properly. For safe operation, your paint booth setup must meet fire code, exhaust, and airflow requirements.

Overview of Safety Regulations

There are both federal and local regulations that may apply to your paint booth. For example, The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has criteria for spray booths, and so does the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). Because painting involves hazardous and/or flammable chemicals, it is essential to make sure controls are in place to prevent injuries to people and property. There are several essential aspects for paint booth safety:

  • Fire mitigation
  • Air quality
  • Ventilation
  • Airflow
  • Electrical safety
  • Personnel protection

Most federal requirements cover the manufacturing of paint booths, so you don’t necessarily have to be familiar with them as long as you purchase your booth from a reputable manufacturer. However, you still have to make sure you follow your local government’s codes when installing your paint booth.

Local Rules and Codes

One of the first steps toward getting a paint booth is understanding your city or county’s building and permit codes. For example, your local government may require you to pull certain permits before installing and operating a paint booth in your building. Local regulations may also require you to get a paint booth with a third-party safety certification, such as an ETL-listed paint booth.

Paint booths utilize flammable substances, so adequate fire protection is essential, both for the spray booth and the shop itself. Before you choose a paint booth, you should check your state or local regulations to find out if you need to have a fire suppression system. Even if your local laws don’t require you to install this type of equipment, you may want to schedule a building inspection by your fire marshal to ensure everything is safe and up to code before you order and install a paint booth.

Another aspect of spray booth operation involves air quality. Improperly designed or installed paint booths can release hazardous air pollutants, which can have serious environmental effects that can harm people and property.

Your local EPA office may provide information on reducing HAPs. Depending on your circumstances, you may need to follow National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants guidelines. Proper operation of your paint booth is another key aspect of reducing harmful emissions. Ensuring compliance with local EPA regulations can help you protect your community and environment.

Elements of a Safe Shop

The exact requirements for your building may depend on the type of paint booth you plan to install. For example, a woodworking spray booth is different than an automotive paint booth. Each paint booth model may have unique requirements for power/voltage, ventilation, and airflow. The dimensions of your shop, including the height of the ceiling, may also limit your options to paint booths of a certain size.

Many buildings require ductwork to carry paint booth exhaust outside. The design of your ductwork depends on the layout of your shop and your local regulations. The ductwork and shop layout requirements may change if you decide to add an air make-up unit to your booth.

Purchasing and Setting Up Your Paint Booth

When you’re ready to enhance your shop with a paint booth, the first step is to walk through all the safety protocols and local regulations to ensure you create a safe environment for operating a spray booth. You can talk to your local government authorities, electricians, and fire protection agencies to ensure your paint booth setup complies with applicable regulations. It’s essential to know about ductwork, fire suppression, and ETL requirements before choosing a paint booth.

Once you’ve worked through these steps, you can choose the right spray booth. Our expert associates can help you figure out which model meets your operational and budgetary requirements. We can even customize your paint booth or help you choose an AMU to improve productivity and performance. Give us a call when you’re ready to get started at 888-312-7488.

What Are the Benefits of an AMU?

Adding an Air Makeup Unit to a paint booth can provide several unique advantages that increase overall productivity and improve finish quality. While the basic function of an AMU is fairly simple, the number of benefits it offers is impressive. An AMU provides a solution to issues created by the air pressure imbalances that can occur during paint booth operation.

Counteracting Negative Air Pressure

During operation, the exhaust system of a paint booth utilizes and then expels a large volume of air. This significant amount of air movement can quickly create an imbalance of air pressure. When air leaves the inside of a booth without being replaced at the same rate, the internal air pressure quickly becomes lower than the external air pressure. A negative air pressure situation such as this can cause several adverse effects:

  • Strong drafts, especially around windows and doors
  • Low-quality indoor air
  • Imperfect paint curing
  • Malfunctioning exhaust fans
  • Poor temperature control
  • Suction pressure that makes doors difficult to open

The Air Makeup Unit fixes these issues by addressing the underlying cause: negative air pressure. The AMU provides air to a paint booth at the proper rate to replace the air that’s lost through exhaust. Many systems can automatically balance the pressure by making small adjustments to offset pressure changes such as a door opening.

Removing Air Particulates

SureCure Vertical AMU

The pressure and quality of the air inside a paint booth can have a significant effect on the overall finish of the coating. When there is negative air pressure inside the booth, it is easy for dirt and debris to be pulled in when a draft occurs. If the air inside the booth becomes contaminated with particulates, it can severely impact the condition of the final product.

An AMU provides clean, filtered air to a paint booth, improving the overall air quality and reducing particles and debris that can compromise the finish of the coating. This setup may also improve the overall air quality in the building itself, because there is no longer a need to draw unfiltered outdoor air inside to address pressure inequalities.

Reducing Curing Time

An AMU can improve productivity by reducing the time it takes to complete a project. It can take an inordinately long time for a finish to cure in cold air. Some AMU models have a heating option that can provide warm air to the booth, creating the ideal environment for optimal curing efficiency. A heated AMU may be especially helpful during the winter months to eliminate prolonged curing times due to cold temperatures.

Improving the Working Environment

An AMU can significantly improve the operation of a paint booth, enhancing both efficiency and finish quality. In addition, there are other advantages that an AMU can provide:

  • Faster curing time
  • Reduced load on a building’s HVAC system
  • Improved indoor air quality
  • Lower energy requirements
  • Less risk of personnel injuries from pressurized doors

Managing shop conditions and ensuring finish quality is easy when there is an AMU system controlling pressure and air quality.

Choosing the Right AMU

Adding an AMU to your paint booth is a simple way to improve your productivity, cut production costs, and ensure exceptional quality on all your finishes. There are several models available, and each one has unique advantages. Contact us to learn about all the options and determine which one is the best solution to your needs. You can give us a call at 888-312-7488 or email us at sales@paint-booths.com.

Productivity Challenges In 2020

Productivity Challenges In 2020

It’s a new year in a new decade. At the start of something fresh, it’s traditional to make plans and set goals. It happens every January with new gym memberships and increased sales on romaine. We do it in our personal lives and it’s equally important to set optimistic goals for our business. January is the perfect time to create plans, set strategies and develop tactics for how to get there. During that process, look at equipment needs, personnel gaps, and potential growth opportunities. Once you start brainstorming, excitement will build and you’ll want to get moving sooner rather than later.

It’s easy to get distracted by challenges. Large and small businesses alike face productivity challenges. During these times, leaders look for ways to increase efficiency while also boosting the bottom line. At all levels, keep an eye on improvements to keep the business viable and equip it for growth.

To increase productivity, you need to ask yourself what productivity means to you. It may be better work efficiency, more project profitability, improved job safety or higher quality work produced.

Standard Tools faces these same challenges within our production so we are keenly aware of our customer’s situations. We produce products that offer an affordable way to improve production goals, making it a strong investment for your business in 2020.

Keep reading for our top 5 tips if you’re looking to buy a paint booth in 2020. What are your top goals for 2020 in your business? We’d love to hear.

Standard Tools Production Crew.

Top 5 tips for buying a booth in 2020:

  1. Have a business plan for the new year! This will define what you’re working towards and the strategic plan on how you can get there. This will also outline what your needs are and what you plan to improve.
  2. Select the right paint booth for your needs. It all starts with what you’re painting, what your production goals are and what your investment is. We work with all budgets and can design booths for your specific needs. It’s important for you to know what your local codes and requirements are before you invest in a new booth. Trust us, this saves you a lot of time and headaches in the long run.
  3. Set aggressive goals for the year: Look at what your production is currently and then set a realistic goal for the next 12-months. After you have done that, set an aggressive goal and write down what you need to achieve it. This could include equipment, personnel or other resources.
  4. Do what’s comfortable for you. It’s important to make large purchase decisions with a company where you feel comfortable and with whom you can count on for advice, support and service.
  5. Ask a lot of questions! We have a knowledgeable and friendly sales team that is here to tell you everything we know on paint spray booths. We will ask all the right questions and tell you things you need to consider in the process. We have a team of engineers that can assist in the compliance and design of your new paint booth. You can talk directly with who will be designing and producing your paint booth. Give us a call and pick our brain on everything you ever wanted to know about paint booths, and even some stuff you never knew you needed to know. It’ll help you make a more informed decision and that’s what we’re here for.

Here’s to a prosperous year of achieving your goals. We’re here to help in any way we can, so give us a call at 1-888-312-7488.

Cheers to 2020,

Kat Mendenhall

General Manager, Standard Tools and Equipment Co.

Buy Before January 1st to Save Thousands.*

With the year winding to a close, you may hear a lot about “Section 179” and how you’re business can benefit if you are looking to purchase some equipment before the new year.

We get just as confused as the next guy when you start talking “tax rate”, “deductions” and “depreciation”. We thought we would do a little research and try to explain how this could be a HUGE benefit to small businesses, we should know because Standard Tools is also a small business that takes advantage of incentives such as this.

When we say ‘equipment’, we mean any large purchase you buy to benefit your business. For example, a heated paint booth to help boost your productivity.  Since it’s an ‘investment’ in your business, it is included in this category.

You can even finance it this year and still write it off to save thousands.

So, section 179 is what exactly? It’s an incentive created by the U.S. government to encourage businesses to buy equipment and invest in themselves. Essentially, Section 179 of the IRS tax code allows businesses to deduct the full purchase price of qualifying equipment purchased (or financed) during the tax year. Wow! The FULL PURCHASE PRICE will be deducted from your gross income. (As long as the total purchase price is less than $2.2 million on equipment. Continue reading Buy Before January 1st to Save Thousands.*

Install Your Own Spray Booth! Case Study

At Howard Classic Boats, their number one commitment is to preserve and advance the enjoyment of Antique and Classic Boats.

When they contacted Standard Tools about a finishing booth to use on these beautiful boats, we couldn’t wait to get started. They needed a custom booth, so our engineers worked to get it designed to fit their needs. A 14’ X 11’ X 35’ powder-coated semi-downdraft booth was in the works.

Located on the Grand Lake O’ the Cherokees in North East Oklahoma, Howard Classic Boats restores Antique and Classic Boats from 13’ to 42’. When working on these gems, dust is a consummate problem in trying for that flawless finish on the boats and parts. Continue reading Install Your Own Spray Booth! Case Study

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