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Choosing the Right Paint Booth Filters & Knowing When to Replace Them

paint booth air filters

Air filters are key elements in any paint booth; they help ensure the booth operates properly, efficiently, and safely. Your spray booth cannot perform with clogged filters or incorrect media. Ignoring filter maintenance can also place everyone in the shop at risk for health and safety problems. Choosing the right filters, installing them correctly, and knowing the appropriate time to change them is essential in preventative maintenance.

Types of Paint Booth Filters

There are several different types of filter media to capture debris, foreign particles, overspray, and other contaminants.

  • Intake filters prevent dust, debris, and other small particles from entering your paint booth. Without a well-functioning filter, these tiny particles can damage the finish quality. Each type of paint booth (e.g. downdraft, cross flow) may have a different style of intake filter, but the purpose is always the same: to protect the finish from contaminants.There will be a different type of intake filters for booths that are heated with an air makeup unit.
  • Exhaust filters trap overspray and other chemicals to prevent them from building up on the fans and from being released outside the booth. There are several different types of exhaust filters, including bags and blankets. Clogged exhaust filters can allow toxic chemicals into the environment, increase the risk of fire, and/or reduce the performance of the entire spray booth.
  • AMU filters are part of an air makeup unit, which provides replacement air into the booth to stabilize interior air pressure. AMU filters capture large particles from outside air before entering the AMU and reducies the load on the booth’s other filters before entering the booth.
  • Optional filters can be added to your paint booth to create a two-sage or three-stage filtration. For example, a carbon polyester filter can capture minute contaminants responsible for unpleasant odors. A pre-filter can take care of sawdust and powder-coating particles before they enter the bag filter. Depending on what you are spraying, this may be required.

The best way to know which type of replacement filters to get for your paint booth is to check the manufacturer’s specifications. It’s vital to choose the correct style, size, and material for the replacement filters to ensure your paint booth continues to function optimally.

When To Change a Filter

By nature, filters will eventually become clogged with debris. It’s essential to replace them when they become full of debris. Using a paint booth with clogged filters drastically reduces the quality of the finish, the operational efficiency, and the safety of the shop’s personnel.

It’s important to follow the manufacturer’s instructions for determining when to change your filters. Recommendations may be based on the number of operating hours or on calendar weeks/months. There may also be OSHA, EPA, and/or state guidelines for filter maintenance that you should be aware of and follow.

The exact operating conditions of your shop can affect the time it takes for your filters to get clogged, so you may need to replace them sooner than the average time frame recommended by the manufacturer. There are several visual cues you can rely on to determine when it’s time to change your filters.

  • Intake filters: debris in the booth and/or blemishes in the finish
  • Exhaust filters: overspray remaining in the booth and/or continuous operation of the fan at 100% capacity

In general, you should wait no longer than six months to replace an intake filter. It’s a good idea to replace an exhaust filter at least every month. However, it’s best to conscientiously monitor the filters to determine when they are ready to be replaced. You can use a manometer in addition to the visual cues described above to get a clear and accurate picture of how your filters are performing.

Understanding a Manometer

Installing a manometer on your paint booth can make it easier to see when it’s time to change the filter. All booths from Standard Tools come with a Dwyer manometer to measure air pressure. You should install a manometer at the rear of the paint booth near the exhaust filter so it can measure the difference in air pressure inside the booth before the filters and on the other side of the exhaust filters. The more clogged the filters are, the less air flow there is through the filters.

Once you install and calibrate a manometer, you can monitor when the filter starts affecting the booth’s airflow and interior air pressure. We recommend changing exhaust filters when your manometer reading is 0.5” above the initial calibrated level. Watch how to install your manometer on our YouTube channel.

Proper Filter Maintenance Keeps Your Paint Booth Working Efficiently

You can use the manometer readings and visual observations to determine when the filters are full and need to be replaced. We carry a wide range of high-quality intake, exhaust, and AMU filters for various spray booth models. You can order in bulk to ensure you always have replacement filters on hand. Contact us today; our experienced team is ready to answer your questions and recommend the right replacement filters for your booth.

Upgrade Your Shop with a Paint Mixing Room

Paint mixing room

Whether your shop is dedicated to painting automobiles, creating furniture, or finishing cabinets, having the right equipment makes all the difference. Even if you already have a spray booth for finishing your products, you may want to consider installing a paint mixing booth. Investing in a dedicated paint mixing room can significantly improve the safety and productivity of your shop.

Benefits of a Paint Mixing Room

Mixing and storing paint and finishing products on an industrial scale requires planning and preparation. With a dedicated paint mixing room, you can increase the efficiency of your workflow and bring your shop into compliance with safety standards and local codes.

Safety

One of the most important benefits of a paint mixing room is an improvement in your shop’s safety conditions. Most finishing products, including paint, varnish, and solvents, are extremely flammable. It’s essential to keep these chemicals away from heat sources, which is far easier when you have a dedicated room in which to mix and store them.

Productivity

You can greatly increase the productivity of your operation by installing a paint mixing room. It gives you a secure, separate space in which to organize and store all your finishing products and mixing equipment. Having everything in one place can eliminate the need to find and set up equipment every time you want to use it. It’s far easier to deploy spill containment measures in a dedicated space.

Code Compliance

It’s essential to make sure your operation complies with safety and building codes. Installing a mixing booth can make it easier to ensure you are following all relevant legal requirements. Both the National Fire Protection Agency and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration have regulations that apply to mixing and storing paint and chemicals. Paint mixing booths are designed around these requirements, so installing one in your shop is a simple way to establish compliance with essential codes.

Reduce Contaminants

A mixing booth allows you to mix and store finishing products in an isolated environment where you can filter the air, significantly reducing dirt and other foreign matter. Lowering the amount of dust and debris in the preparation area helps ensure your finishing products are free from contaminants that can damage the final quality of the finish.

Air Quality

Primer, paint, lacquer, and other products used in the finishing process can release toxic fumes that can damage indoor air quality and present a risk to shop personnel. A paint mixing room has built-in ventilation, which can help reduce dangerous particulates in the air, improving the shop’s working environment.

Paint Mixing Booth Design

A mixing booth is exactly what it sounds like: a stand-alone booth set aside for preparing and storing paint and finishing products. There are several key features to look for when choosing a paint mixing booth:

  • Heavy-duty wall panels
  • A secure door
  • Appropriate exhaust and ventilation components
  • A proper air intake filter
  • Excellent lighting
  • Code-compliant fire protection measures
  • Easy control panel for light operation

In many cases, paint mixing booths are designed for DIY assembly. It’s essential to choose a booth that comes with clear, easy-to-follow assembly instructions.

Paint Mixing Booths and Code Regulations

A mixing booth is subject to vital safety codes, most of which are based on NFPA requirements and/or OSHA guidelines for different aspects of the design:

  • Safe storage for paint/flammable liquids (the allowable quantity is based on the distance between the mixing room and the spray booth)
  • Automatic fire protection system
  • Continuously operating ventilation fan providing adequate air movement
  • Appropriate size dimensions
  • Effective spill containment
  • ETL-certified electrical components

It’s vital to choose a mixing booth that complies with these federal codes as well as any local safety regulations that exist in your area.

Getting Maximum Value Out of Your Paint Mixing Booth

A paint mixing booth is an excellent addition to your shop, making it easier and safer to organize, mix, and store your finishing products. When you are choosing a mixing booth, make sure to find one that fits well in your shop and complies with all applicable safety codes.

We make it easy for you to get the right mixing booth. Our mixing booths come in three standard sizes, but we can also create a customized booth for you in any size up to 150 sq. ft. All of our mixing booths are compliant with NFPA and OSHA standards, and they’re also ETL-certified. We design our booths for easy assembly and offer flexible placement options for the door, light, and fan. Our production is fast, so you can get your booth up and running in just days. When you’re ready to enhance your shop with a dedicated paint mixing booth, we are here to help. Contact our team for answers to your questions or details on our customization options.

Paint Booths for Wood Finishing: What You Need to Know

While most spray booths operate in similar ways, there are some characteristics that make certain models better for specific tasks. Woodworking spray booths are specifically designed to enhance the finishing process for wood items, including furniture and art pieces. These specialized spray booths offer many advantages, making the finishing process better, safer, and more efficient.

Spray Booths and Wood Finishing

In general, a paint booth provides a place to apply finishes to three-dimensional objects. In the field of woodworking, different projects may require unique finishes and coatings:

  • Stain
  • Paint
  • Sealer
  • Primer
  • Glaze
  • Powder coating (for MDF)
  • Lacquer
  • Varnish

Woodworking paint booths are designed to make it easier to finish wood items, improving the final appearance and condition.

Benefits of a Woodworking Spray Booth

A paint booth provides a favorable environment for the wood-finishing process. There are several advantages a specialized spray booth provides in a woodworking shop:

  • Better lighting, which can allow the operator to identify and fix issues with the finish
  • Proper ventilation, which can improve the overall air quality in the shop
  • Upgraded safety measures, which can help mitigate fire risks
  • Filtered exhaust mechanisms, which can reduce overspray and air pressure problems

Finishing furniture and other wood products is safer and faster with a paint booth that’s customized for woodworking.

Types of Woodworking Paint Booths

Spray booths for wood finishing are available in different configurations, but there are two styles that are the most common: enclosed and open face. Each type has unique benefits and challenges that render it better for certain shops and projects.

Enclosed Paint Booths

In general, enclosed spray booths take up more space in a shop than open face models. You must allow space for all four sides of the booth plus additional room for the doors to open. Enclosed paint booths also tend to be more expensive. However, this design makes it far easier to reduce contaminants that can degrade the quality of the finish. With an enclosed booth, it can be easier to control the air pressure and the airflow style and, in turn, the finish quality.

Open Face Paint Booths

As the name implies, an open face spray booth usually has three walls and a ceiling, with the fourth side being open to the rest of the shop. This style is generally more affordable than an enclosed model and may take up less floor space. Some open face booths are wider than they are deep (the opposite of many enclosed models), which may be better for some woodworking projects such as finishing cabinet doors. However, the open nature of this type of spray booth makes is more difficult to eliminate the contaminants that can negatively affect the finish.

Considerations When Choosing a Paint Booth

When you’re ready to upgrade the functionality of your woodworking shop with a spray booth, there are several things to consider. As discussed above, one of the most important aspects to decide on is whether you want an open face or enclosed model. There are other essential factors:

  • Size
  • Exhaust infrastructure
  • Fans and ductwork
  • ETL certification

The specifications of your shop may limit your options to booths of a specific size and/or exhaust structure. Your local laws may require you to purchase an ETL-certified model, or you may choose to do so for the added safety benefits.

Upgrade Your Shop with a Woodworking Spray Booth

The right paint booth can simplify the finishing process for countless types of wood items. Whether you are making wood furniture or crafting wood art pieces, you can count on a gorgeous finish when you use a specialized woodworking spray booth.

We offer a variety of spray booths designed for wood finishing, including both open face and enclosed models. ETL-listed booths are available, and we can also develop and manufacture a customized solution based on your unique requirements. Contact our team to learn more about our woodworking paint booth options.

ETL Certification: What Is It and Why Is It Important?

When you are choosing a paint booth, one thing you need to consider is ETL certification. Spray booths with this certification have been rigorously tested and verified to comply with certain safety codes. Some state and local regulations may require you to install an ETL-certified model. The ETL Mark can give you peace of mind that your paint booth meets the highest safety standards and won’t give you any issues with local authorities.

ETL Certification and OSHA

ETL stands for Electrical Testing Laboratories, and it’s an organization that tests the safety of products and electronic components based on a set of rigid standards. While this company has been around for over 100 years (it was started by Thomas Edison), it now functions as a division of Intertek Testing Laboratories. Intertek ETL is a Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory acknowledged by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration.

Paint Booth Compliance with Safety Codes

Intertek tests products based on North American safety standards and applies the ETL Mark to products and components that meet compliance requirements. One relevant safety code for paint booths is NFPA-33, which is the National Fire Protection Association’s standard for spray application using flammable or combustible materials. An ETL Mark on a paint booth indicates that Intertek finds it in compliance with NFPA-33 standards.

Another element of ETL testing for a paint booth covers the electrical control panel that operates the fans and lights. The relevant safety codes for a control panel are C 22.2 No. 14 and UL-508A. At Standard Tools and Equipment, we are an authorized ETL shop by Intertek for all the control panels we manufacture. We affix the ETL mark to these components prior to shipping them out to you.

Government Requirements and ETL-Listed Paint Booths

There are many advantages to purchasing an ETL-listed paint booth, and you may decide that you want these benefits in your shop. In some cases, however, you may not have a choice; certain state or federal laws may require you to get an ETL-listed booth. There may also be local ordinances or fire codes that necessitate you choosing ETL-listed equipment for your shop.

In general, you may need an ETL-listed paint booth if your shop is in a large city or a state with high safety standards (e.g. WA, CA, OR, MN, RI, CT, MA, and NY). Most government facilities require ETL-listed equipment. Before ordering a paint booth, it’s best to contact your local authorities for information on certification requirements.

Obtaining the ETL Mark for a Paint Booth

There are two ways to obtain an ETL mark for your paint booth: purchase an ETL-listed model or schedule an Intertek inspection and certification after you install an uncertified spray booth. Getting the ETL mark upon purchase can save you a significant amount of time and money.

Standard Tools and Equipment offers several ETL-listed models that include the following:

  • An air valve solenoid that interlocks the spray equipment and the fan motor
  • An electrical control panel that is ETL-listed
  • An official ETL certification label on the booth

Having the ETL mark on your paint booth can show your clients, employees, and local authorities that you value safety and have taken the necessary precautions.

Selecting the Right ETL-Listed Paint Booth

Whether your local laws require you to get an ETL-listed booth or you simply want the confidence that comes with knowing your booth meets the standards, we can help you choose the right certified paint booth. We have a wide range of ETL-listed models, including semidown, cross flow, and open face options. You can also choose an ETL-listed booth that includes a heated AMU for more control over the finishing process. When you order a booth from Standard Tools that has been certified, it is included in the listed booth’s price. Purchasing an ETL-listed booth is far more cost-efficient than requesting a certification inspection after installation should you need it. Our diverse selection of paint booths makes it easy to find the right model for your needs. For additional information on the ETL certification or assistance in choosing a paint booth, contact our team at 888-312-7488.

Paint Booth Operations: 4 Reasons Why Proper Airflow is Essential

No matter what type of paint booth you have, you want it to perform optimally. There are many things that can affect a spray booth’s operational capability, but one of the most important is airflow.

Maintaining proper airflow can ensure your booth creates perfect finishes and operates within acceptable safety parameters. On the other hand, airflow problems can compromise the booth’s efficiency, performance, and longevity. Understanding the basics of airflow and the methods for controlling it can help you operate your paint booth safely and effectively.

1. Finish Quality

Airflow within your paint booth can have a significant effect on the overall finish of whatever you are painting. Adequate, balanced airflow helps ensure the paint sprays uniformly and dries quickly. However, incorrect airflow may cause several problems:

  • Incomplete or uneven drying
  • Non-uniform finish
  • Introduction of dust and debris within the booth

Even small variances in airflow can cause problems with the finish on your project, and in some cases, you may have to repaint the object entirely. Controlling the airflow within your paint booth is essential for a high-quality finish.

2. Overspray Management

The overspray in a paint booth can cause significant issues if it’s not handled properly. The paint booth needs to direct the overspray away from the object being painted so as not to ruin the finish.

However, the overspray can’t just be pulled out of the booth and released into the shop; that could compromise the air quality and create a dangerous working environment for your operators. The overspray must be directed to air filters that are designed to capture it safely. It’s vital to replace clogged air filters immediately. If you continue to run a paint booth with clogged filters, it could unbalance the air pressure, forcing the overspray into the shop’s air.

3. Air Pressure Balance

Safe, effective spray booth operation requires proper air pressure within the booth, and managing airflow is the key to maintaining the correct pressure. During operation, exhausted air is removed from the booth, which can create negative air pressure. The easiest way to resolve this issue is to install an air makeup unit that replaces the exhausted air at the correct rate to balance the air pressure within the booth. A heated AMU is especially useful, as it can provide warm replacement air to speed up the curing process.

In most spray booths, there are two types of fans that manage the airflow. The exhaust fan pulls used air from the booth toward the ductwork and removes the overspray so it doesn’t affect the finish quality. An AMU uses a blower fan to push replacement air into the booth. Controlling the airflow with these fans allows you to maintain the correct air pressure inside the booth.

4. Safety

Ensuring proper airflow is a vital element of safe paint booth operation. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the National Fire Protection Association even have specific requirements for air velocity within paint booths.

Adequate airflow helps reduce the risk of fire by lowering the concentration of flammable materials in the booth’s air. The exact nature and direction of the airflow within a spray booth vary depending on the design:

No matter what type of paint booth you choose, it’s essential to ensure compliance with OSHA and NFPA airflow requirements.

Maintaining Proper Airflow for Optimal Performance

Proper airflow is a vital aspect of safe and effective paint booth operation. While the exact airflow requirements and directional patterns depend on the type of spray booth, federal safety guidelines define the appropriate parameters. Several things can impact the airflow and air pressure within your booth: clogged filters, malfunctioning fans, and inadequate AMU performance. If you aren’t sure whether your spray booth is maintaining adequate airflow, we can help you figure out the next step. Contact us to learn more about troubleshooting airflow problems and replacing broken equipment.

RAISING THE STANDARDS OF SAFETY

Every day we are lucky enough to work with customers from practically every industry. We get to hear stories of what our customers are painting, finishing, creating. We get to hear about their business.

Cars, Boats and Train Cars. Large Hollywood studios, retailers and car manufacturers. We sell to the agricultural industry, theme parks, universities and music makers. We sell to prop masters, furniture makers and industries that require ‘clean rooms’. We have the gamut of customers. They are all using the paint booth for a slightly different application, but one thing remains important: safety.

At Standard Tools, we also get to hear the stories in the field that are the very reason for safety, compliance, and codes. We have dozens of examples on the importance of being safe. All too often these lessons are learned the hard way. If you Google “body shop fires” it will haunt you to see the images of the businesses burned to the ground from not using the correct equipment or practicing unsafe operations.

At Standard Tools, we set the bar high for customer satisfaction. At the very top of that list is safety. We want our booths, employees, customers and users to be safe. We encourage them to have a booth that is compliant and will give them very little trouble for the years to come, serving them well and protecting against those dangerous situations.

Continue reading RAISING THE STANDARDS OF SAFETY

Install Your Own Spray Booth! Case Study

At Howard Classic Boats, their number one commitment is to preserve and advance the enjoyment of Antique and Classic Boats.

When they contacted Standard Tools about a finishing booth to use on these beautiful boats, we couldn’t wait to get started. They needed a custom booth, so our engineers worked to get it designed to fit their needs. A 14’ X 11’ X 35’ powder-coated semi-downdraft booth was in the works.

Located on the Grand Lake O’ the Cherokees in North East Oklahoma, Howard Classic Boats restores Antique and Classic Boats from 13’ to 42’. When working on these gems, dust is a consummate problem in trying for that flawless finish on the boats and parts. Continue reading Install Your Own Spray Booth! Case Study

Industrial ETL-Listed Open-Faced Booth: Painting Tanks!

“The paint booth [open faced booth] has been fantastic. The amount of time it saves us and the result of increased production it has paid for itself. Plus, the fact that our spray guns are wired through the booth so they cannot work without the fans on for safety purposes.”

Open face booth photo

Cramer Decker is a global leader in the development and delivery of innovative life support technologies and gas management solutions, according to their web site.

They ordered our open face booth for their facilities in California. They use it in the industrial application of coating tanks. They ship the tanks out empty, to be eventually filled by their customers with gases like oxygen, nitrogen or argon.

They have an ETL-certified 20′ wide open-faced booth (OFB-20). With the ETL-listing the booth also received the Standard Tools control panel for operating the lights and fan.

The open-faced design draws air into the booth through the open front, which is then exhausted through the back wall filters. The open front makes it easy to load the tanks and spray them. This application is also great for furniture, cabinets, bulky equipment or small equipment. It is like our paint wall, but with an “awning” of lights and some side walls to contain the over-spray.

Our open face booths come in a variety of widths to fit every application! Whether you’re painting furniture, parts and pieces or tanks… we have a booth for that.

Shop online.

Give us a call with any questions at 888-312-7488.

Continue reading Industrial ETL-Listed Open-Faced Booth: Painting Tanks!

Industrial Paint Wall For Flawless Chrome Detail

A passion for car restoration turns into a major business of unique pieces.

I recently had the pleasure to work with and get to know Mr. Donald Pirre when he purchased an Industrial Paint Wall for his company, Coat of Chrome. He told me that he “chromes” anything, and I was intrigued. Don is not just a “chromer” (is that a word?) … but he is a true artist and master of his trade. Can you really chrome anything? Let’s see.

Gold chromed microphones for famous singers? Check.
20151118_115115Gold Chromed mask that looks like it belongs in the next Star Wars movie? Check.

 

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Silver Chromed Football Trophy? Check.

20151118_125304Coat of Chrome was born out of his passion for restoring classic antique vehicles. His award winning automobiles include a 1967 Chevelle Malibu convertible and a 1967 Chevelle SS convertible. He discovered that it was a challenge to re-chrome parts due to the expense as well as the lack of service providers.

Don learned of a process used in Canada and Europe, which was not only effective for his auto restoration but also for numerous other applications. He went to Canada and learned from the experts and came back to open his business in 2003. Coat of Chrome can coat any type of material (metal, wood, glass, plastic, stone, fiberglass, ceramic, even fabric, etc.) with a mirror-finish, silver-metal coating that exactly duplicates chrome plating or colored chrome finishes. Continue reading Industrial Paint Wall For Flawless Chrome Detail

NESHAP Standards & Your Paint Booth

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NESHAP Standards & Your Paint Booth

What you need to know about NESHAP requirements before you buy your spray booth.

Do you remember that movie, based on a true story, Erin Brockovich? Julie Roberts won an Oscar for her portrayal of the real-life environmentalist that went after a power company in Texas after contaminating the drinking water and caused many health issues in the community? That’s what I think of when I think of the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP).

The goal is to reduce hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), which are pollutants that are known or suspected to cause cancer or other serious health effects, such as reproductive effects or birth defects. HAPs are also known to cause adverse environmental effects.

NESHAP three-stage filter wall in cross flow paint booth


Clean Air Act

Americans are breathing easier and living healthier lives since the Clean Air Act was enacted in 1970. The EPA has made the reduction of HAPs a priority since the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. It’s important if you are working with these pollutants, you follow the rules of compliance for working safely. The National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) were developed in the 1970 (Clean Air Act – CAA) for hazardous air pollutants and revisited / enforced in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990.

First & Before: If you are looking to buy a booth, we always recommend that you speak with your local officials first to find out what is required. You’ll thank us later when you’re not paying to “get compliant”. This will vary based on where you are, what your spraying, etc. Your fire marshal can give you the city’s requirements, like if your booth needs to be ETL-listed (which we have), but you should also contact your local EPA office to see if you will be required to meet NESHAP requirements as well. It’s a good idea to have all your permits in place before you buy your booth. Read our blog to see all Top 10 Things you need to consider before buying a paint booth.

Know what you’re spraying. Do you know what you’re spraying? Have you read the labels and made yourself familiar with what all those ingredients are? Do you have the proper protective gear and equipment for you and your staff, to protect their health and safety?

If you are required to follow the NESHAP guidelines, here are some of the regulations by the EPA that you need to know:

  • Spray booths used to refinish complete motor vehicles or mobile equipment must be fully enclosed and ventilated at negative pressure or up to 0.05 inches water gauge positive pressure for booths that have seals on all doors and other openings and an automatic pressure balancing system.
  • Spray booths used to coat miscellaneous parts or products or vehicle sub-assemblies must have a full roof, at least three complete walls or side curtains, and ventilated so that air is drawn into the booth.
  • Spray-applied coatings must be applied with a high-volume, low pressure (HVLP) spray gun, electrostatic application, airless or air-assisted airless spray gun, or an equivalent technology.
  • Paint spray gun cleaning must be done so that an atomized mist or spray of the cleaning solvent is not created outside a container that collects used gun cleaning solvent.
  • Train and certify all personnel who spray apply surface coatings no later than 180 days after hiring.
  • Install/operate filter technologies on all spray booths to achieve at least 98% capture efficiency.

NESHAP three-stage filter wall in cross flow paint booth
NESHAP sanding booth with two MERV 11 filter boxes for recirculated air.

That last one, about the correct filtration, can be a bit tricky to understand if you’re not a “filter expert”. So, we consulted our filter experts about it and came up with the solution.

We can now provide you with a booth that has been designed for three- or two-stage NESHAP filtration. If it is two-stage, it means that your overspray will pass through 2 different filters before it is exhausted. If it is three-stage filtration, it will go through… you guessed it, three different filters. This is to ensure that the air is properly filtered of all contaminates before exhausted.

The booth will have a larger-than-normal fan to pull the air through multiple filters and there will be a “set” of different types of filters, based on your needs for compliance. The blanket filter pads, pocket filters, MERV 11 Filters and more are stacked to fit you needs. We choose filters with the efficiency you need to meet the 98% capture requirement.

We’re here to help you figure it out and get you setup to be successful, compliant, and safe. We don’t want Erin Brockovich coming after you next. Give us a call.

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