Shopping Cart

Your cart is currently empty.

Choosing the Right Paint Booth Filters & Knowing When to Replace Them

paint booth air filters

Air filters are key elements in any paint booth; they help ensure the booth operates properly, efficiently, and safely. Your spray booth cannot perform with clogged filters or incorrect media. Ignoring filter maintenance can also place everyone in the shop at risk for health and safety problems. Choosing the right filters, installing them correctly, and knowing the appropriate time to change them is essential in preventative maintenance.

Types of Paint Booth Filters

There are several different types of filter media to capture debris, foreign particles, overspray, and other contaminants.

  • Intake filters prevent dust, debris, and other small particles from entering your paint booth. Without a well-functioning filter, these tiny particles can damage the finish quality. Each type of paint booth (e.g. downdraft, cross flow) may have a different style of intake filter, but the purpose is always the same: to protect the finish from contaminants.There will be a different type of intake filters for booths that are heated with an air makeup unit.
  • Exhaust filters trap overspray and other chemicals to prevent them from building up on the fans and from being released outside the booth. There are several different types of exhaust filters, including bags and blankets. Clogged exhaust filters can allow toxic chemicals into the environment, increase the risk of fire, and/or reduce the performance of the entire spray booth.
  • AMU filters are part of an air makeup unit, which provides replacement air into the booth to stabilize interior air pressure. AMU filters capture large particles from outside air before entering the AMU and reducies the load on the booth’s other filters before entering the booth.
  • Optional filters can be added to your paint booth to create a two-sage or three-stage filtration. For example, a carbon polyester filter can capture minute contaminants responsible for unpleasant odors. A pre-filter can take care of sawdust and powder-coating particles before they enter the bag filter. Depending on what you are spraying, this may be required.

The best way to know which type of replacement filters to get for your paint booth is to check the manufacturer’s specifications. It’s vital to choose the correct style, size, and material for the replacement filters to ensure your paint booth continues to function optimally.

When To Change a Filter

By nature, filters will eventually become clogged with debris. It’s essential to replace them when they become full of debris. Using a paint booth with clogged filters drastically reduces the quality of the finish, the operational efficiency, and the safety of the shop’s personnel.

It’s important to follow the manufacturer’s instructions for determining when to change your filters. Recommendations may be based on the number of operating hours or on calendar weeks/months. There may also be OSHA, EPA, and/or state guidelines for filter maintenance that you should be aware of and follow.

The exact operating conditions of your shop can affect the time it takes for your filters to get clogged, so you may need to replace them sooner than the average time frame recommended by the manufacturer. There are several visual cues you can rely on to determine when it’s time to change your filters.

  • Intake filters: debris in the booth and/or blemishes in the finish
  • Exhaust filters: overspray remaining in the booth and/or continuous operation of the fan at 100% capacity

In general, you should wait no longer than six months to replace an intake filter. It’s a good idea to replace an exhaust filter at least every month. However, it’s best to conscientiously monitor the filters to determine when they are ready to be replaced. You can use a manometer in addition to the visual cues described above to get a clear and accurate picture of how your filters are performing.

Understanding a Manometer

Installing a manometer on your paint booth can make it easier to see when it’s time to change the filter. All booths from Standard Tools come with a Dwyer manometer to measure air pressure. You should install a manometer at the rear of the paint booth near the exhaust filter so it can measure the difference in air pressure inside the booth before the filters and on the other side of the exhaust filters. The more clogged the filters are, the less air flow there is through the filters.

Once you install and calibrate a manometer, you can monitor when the filter starts affecting the booth’s airflow and interior air pressure. We recommend changing exhaust filters when your manometer reading is 0.5” above the initial calibrated level. Watch how to install your manometer on our YouTube channel.

Proper Filter Maintenance Keeps Your Paint Booth Working Efficiently

You can use the manometer readings and visual observations to determine when the filters are full and need to be replaced. We carry a wide range of high-quality intake, exhaust, and AMU filters for various spray booth models. You can order in bulk to ensure you always have replacement filters on hand. Contact us today; our experienced team is ready to answer your questions and recommend the right replacement filters for your booth.

CHANGE YOUR FILTERS IN A SNAP WITH OUR NEW FILTER MEDIA BLANKET

Blanket Filter Media
Standard Tools and Equipment Co. Booth with Blanket Exhaust Filters Installed.

 

If you’re a high production shop, doing a lot of spraying, naturally, you’ll need to change the filter media in your booth often. Changing your filter media is an important maintenance for your booth…. but let’s be honest, it’s time consuming. Do you wish there was an easier way to change them? Meet the blanket filter….. it’s going to change your life. Never change numerous 20” x 20” exhaust filters again.

Order our filter media blanket by the 100’ roll and a set of quick clips to get started. Just cut the filter blanket to the size you need and clip into the quick clips at the top and bottom and you’re set to go!

The blanket filter media fits over your existing filter grids, so there is no structure changes you need to make to your booth.

Our dense heavy-duty two-stage 22g media is 50% heavier than the 15g counterpart. Manufactured from continuous strands of glass fibers with 2.5” loading area backed with 100% fiberglass scrim backing.

Compliant with current EPA standards as well as many local municipal regulations. The 22g fiberglass construction provides excellent removal efficiency at an affordable price.

WANT TO SEE MORE ABOUT THE FILTER MEDIA BLANKET?

Julie and John also had a little fun with the blanket filter. If you want to see an appearance from Filterman installing the blanket filter, click here.
More filter media is available on our web site at: https://www.paint-booths.com/category/paint-booth-filters.html

Spanish Translation Blog: ¿Por qué son necesarios los filtros de escape?

Uno de los principales propósitos de una cabina de rociado es capturar el exceso de rociado. No quera que escape encima de su edificio. Tus compañeros no quieren que se deposite en sus vehículos en el estacionamiento. Sus vecinos no lo desean en su propiedad. El gobierno no ve favorable que en el rociado entre a la atmósfera, plantas, suelo o agua.

¿Por qué pintar en una cabina sin filtros? Quizás los filtros tienen demasiado exceso de rociado y esperas el reemplazo de filtros. Tal vez le pidieron al pintor que pintara algo mientras se estaba limpiando la cabina. Tal vez el pintor decidió continuar en una cabina de rociadura cuando sabía que los filtros no estaban equipados adecuadamente sobre los orificios del filtro. Estas son las decisiones a corto plazo que conducen a problemas a largo plazo.

¿Por qué nunca debería usted pintar en una cabina de pintura sin filtros? Mira estas fotos que muestran acumulación de sobre-pulverización excesiva en el ventilador, conductos de escape y en un pleno de escape después de diez años de uso limitado. Esto fue sólo una cabina de retoque, no una cabina a nivel de producción, pero el exceso de rociado fue 1.5″ de espesor en algunas zonas. Los peligros de la utilización de una cabina sin filtros es que va a arruinar tu ventilador, motor, conductos,… pero lo más importante, la pintura vieja es apenas tan inflamable como pintura nueva. Pintura vieja dentro de una carcasa del ventilador o red de conductos reduce drásticamente el flujo de aire y la seguridad de la cabina. Permitiendo que el rociado se acumule baja el nivel de las prácticas generales de seguridad. Permitir que se acumule tanto el rociado significa que las tareas de limpieza sean monumentales y es menos probables ser terminado.

La mejor respuesta es rutinariamente vigilar el pleno del escape, filtros, ventilador y ducto de escape. Cambie los filtros según sea necesario.

Mantener filtros frescos es fácil. Tenemos cajas disponibles y el envío gratis.

Visite nuestro sitio web para la compra de filtros para su stand actual.

 

Picture 109 Picture 106 Picture 104

THE PITFALLS OF A USED SPRAY BOOTH

I have had three phone calls in two days from people who have purchased our paint booths second (or third) hand. The problems and costs that they are going through because of poor maintenance, destructive disassembles or their inability to get permitting has made it hard on them. Although our paint booths are of high quality and built to last, there are pitfalls of buying a used booth, no matter who the manufacturer is. Don’t get a used spray booth – it’s more hassle in the end. 

Money is tight.  If your company has survived the Great Recession then you understand this.  Your company may also need a paint booth.  Buying a used paint booth can lead to many unforeseen and unexpected costs.  How do you know what you’re getting?

Standard Tools is in the business of selling new spray booths, but we want to A homemade paint boothlet you in on some of the costs associated with buying a used paint booth. Even if a used paint booth is provided at no cost, the potential costs can be greater than a new spray booth in the end. We have new automotive booths starting at less than $5,000.

CONDITION – A used spray booth is on the market due to one of three situations: a paint booth owner is growing and needs a larger unit, a company is going out of business or a company is no longer painting.  You have no way of knowing if the paint booth was maintained and taken care of. Continue reading THE PITFALLS OF A USED SPRAY BOOTH

Heated Paint Booth: To Add Heat or Not Add Heat, That is The Question

powder coatingIt may seem like there is a lot to consider when you buy a paint booth. It’s easy to get in the “let’s just get going and figure it out later” attitude. Selecting the right type of paint booth and developing a well laid out floor plan will save you thousands in the future. The main thing that folks don’t consider is if they need a heated paint booth to their booth in the future. Right now, they may not need heat because their business only uses it every couple days. But as the business grows and more business coming than you can handle…. you may want to add heat and make your booth work even harder for you. If you buy a Cross Flow, you won’t be able to add heat later. But our popular Side-Down Draft or Semi-Down Draft can be heated at any time… as long you as you consider a few things first to make your life easier later. Continue reading Heated Paint Booth: To Add Heat or Not Add Heat, That is The Question

Keep Your Paint Booth Safe: The Checklist

To keep your paint booth as safe as possible, there are some simple things you should do to maintain your booth and the safety of those who work in it. To make it easier to remember, try adding all of these items to your calendar based on how often it should occur.

 

  • Clean the booth! It’s no secret that to have a great paint job, you need to work in a clean booth!
    –  Sweep and/or mop the floors daily to keep dust off freshly painted surfaces.
    –  Clean the exhaust plenum by sweeping or vacuuming excessive material buildup.
    –  Sweep or vacuum the outside of the booth every year to remove dirt, dust and spider webs that can be sucked into the booth.

 

  • Clean Filters = Clean Air! Change exhaust filters when the manometer reads 0.5” above the initial differential reading. Note: Exhaust filters should be changed if the material about to be sprayed may react with the materials that have already been sprayed and still remain in the filter. Order your new filter kit now.

–  Change intake filters when they appear dirty or every 100 hours of booth usage.

 

  • Inspect elements of your booth. (You want to turn the power to your booth OFF first).

–  Every six months, you should check the fan belts for cracks and tension. Much like automotive belts, they can harden or glaze, and begin to slip.
–  Light fixtures should not have damaged glass or issues with the wire connections.
–  Ensure positive seals on doors, door latches, door hinges, floor sweeps and door gaskets every three months.
–  Check caulking between seams every three months and fill any gaps or cracks.
–  Inspect ductwork every three months for gaps or excessive buildup.

 

  • Maintain a tidy booth! It is critical that the area inside your booth, and the area surrounding your paint booth is as clean as possible. It needs to be free from excessive materials, especially flammable rags and paper products. It’s a good idea to have at least a 3′ perimeter around the booth in all directions that is clean and maintained.

 

  • Schedule semi-annual inspections on your fire suppression system by contacting your local fire suppression supplier.

 

  • Ongoing training for booth users about safety, cleanliness and incident management that includes fires, explosions, spills and fumes.

 

  • Maintain and replace spray equipment (guns, hoses, filters, dryers) and replace routinely.

 

  • Spray booths should contain no more than one shift of spray material and no materials that will react if mixed.

 

  • Mix rooms should contain less than 120 gallons of material.  Materials should be in covered containers.

 

  • Display signage near booth entrances that communicates no smoking, sparks or flames within 20-ft of the booth.

 

  • Contact the experienced team at Standard Tools and Equipment for more helpful tips and information about equipment involved in the finishing process. 1-888-312-7488.

 

Get Your Paint Booth Ready for 2013

John Mauney
Electrical Engineer
Standard Tools and Equipment Co.

DSC_0066‘Tis the season, as they say, for some family time and hopefully a little shop down time. While your booth is enjoying it’s vacation, now is the perfect time to do a once over and make sure you are properly maintaining your booth throughout the year. Here are a few things to check to prepare for the New Year!

Check all of your filters. This is especially important if you have a non-heated booth with a top canopy that has filters. If the filters are loaded and dirty, it puts more negative pressure on the door seals. We offer Filter Kits if you find yourself needing to replace yours.

Check your door seals on the product doors and the personnel door. If the door seals are gone, then air and dust are sucked in around the doors and on to the product resulting in that dirty word “BUFFING”. If they need to be replaced, you can find these seals at any hardware store. Just peel and stick.

 “If there’s a streak, there’s a leak”.  Check around the bottom of the booth, it should be caulked to the floor. This is very important if you use water in your booth for dust control. Water under the bottom channel will shorten the life of the booth due to rusting. Check around the light frames for a proper seal.

A little time with weather stripping, a caulking gun, and some new filters can save you big in the years to come.

Cleaning Your Paint Booth

If a paint booth is supposed to keep dust away from my project, why am I still seeing it?

Well the answer to this question may be an easy one. It may seem that the paint booth is not serving its purpose, but that may not be true. Most likely you have a dirty or poorly maintained booth.  Proper cleanup and maintenance is key for creating flawless finishes, and also provides a safe and competent working environment for painting. Continue reading Cleaning Your Paint Booth

Sign up to our newsletter & Receive Savings In Your Inbox

Sign Up

Copyright © 2020 Standard Tools and Equipment Co.. | Ecommerce Shopping Cart Software by Miva, Inc.