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WHY DO I HAVE TO COMPLY WITH SAFETY CODES?

If you are reading this posting we can assume that you are smarter than the average person.  You have shown an interest in using and maintaining your paint booth and equipment in a safe and effective manner.  What happens when we neglect safe practices and don’t follow safety codes?

The Great Molasses Flood
Great Molasses Flood

In January of 1919, a molasses storage tank in a Boston neighborhood collapsed sending two million gallons of thick goo in waves through the streets, killing 21 people and injuring over 150 people. It’s known as the “Great Molasses Flood”. The city had deemed the structure unsafe for the weight of the material stored but had not enforced its findings.

 

Cocoanut Grove Night Club after the fire
Cocoanut Grove Night Club

On November 28th 1942, a huge fire occurred at the Cocoanut Grove Night Club in Boston. 492 people perished in total. The Cocoanut Grove was originally a speakeasy—an illegal bar during alcohol Prohibition—and some of its doors were bricked up or bolted shut. During the 1990s, former Boston Fire Fighter and researcher Charles Kenney had discovered and concluded that the presence of a highly flammable gas propellant in the refrigeration systems—methyl chloride—greatly contributed to the flashover and quick spread of the fire (there was a shortage of freon in 1942 due to the war effort). As a result of the Cocoanut Grove fire and tragedy, the fire ordinances were expanded.

Continue reading WHY DO I HAVE TO COMPLY WITH SAFETY CODES?

TAKE A LOAD OFF! Unloading Your Equipment.

airliner with a globe and autoloader with boxes in a containerSometimes that’s easier said then done. In this case, it doesn’t have to be difficult; it just requires a little pre-planning on your part. To help you, our customers, avoid issues when your equipment is delivered, here are some things you need to know and prepare for.

 

Some folks don’t realize that when they order a piece of equipment, that they are responsible for getting their equipment off of the truck when it’s delivered. (Yes, you will need to have a plan for how to get it off that truck). Freight carriers will not off-load the equipment for you.

 

To help, we can order you a lift gate that will bring your equipment to the ground for easier transport.  Usually, this is the most helpful on shipments containing tire equipment.  We need to know at the time of order that you would like to have a lift gate added to your freight details, as freight trucks do not always come with them and we want to make sure your equipment gets put on the truck with a lift gate! Note: Even with a lift gate, you are still responsible for getting it off the lift gate and into your shop. 

 

Most equipment requires a forklift, wrecker or roll back to off-load equipment because of the weight and dimensions of the shipment. Our lifts weigh 1500 lbs + and are 10’ or more in length. Our paint booths are packaged in crates.  Many of these will not fit on a lift gate due to the dimensions on the crate (many of the crates are 6’ H x 10’ L and 4’ W).

Watch a video on how you can unload your lift if you have a roll back.

Watch a video on how you can unload your paint booth if you have a roll back.

We give you these details when you place your order as well as when we call you with your shipping confirmation. We are eager to help you, just give our customer service department a call at 1-800-336-2776.

How to Measure Your Roof’s Pitch

Finding your roof’s pitch is an important factor to know when you are ordering and planning your Exhaust kits to go with your Standard Tools and Equipment Paint Booth. Here’s how you can find your roof pitch.

Things you’ll need:
• Ladder • Level • Tape Measure • Marker • Pencil • Paper

1. Measure 12-inches on the level & mark.

Mark the length with the marker. Many levels are equipped with a ruler on the side, but marking it will allow it to be more visible.

2. Climb up to the top of your roof.roof pitch

· Make sure the roof is not wet or icy. It is best to walk on a roof when the sun is out and morning dew has evaporated.
· Make sure the ladder does not damage the gutter or side of the roof.
· Ascend the roof. Crouch down or sit, as to minimize the potential for slipping. · You  can measure pitch from any spot.
· Pull out your tape measure about 1 foot or so.

3. Use your level to measure the roof run.

· While holding the tape measure with one hand, pick up the level with the other and place the bottom corner on the roof.
· Using the level’s corner as your pivot point, hold it parallel with the ground.
· Pivot it up or down until the horizontal vial’s bubble is between the two lines.

4. Measure the rise with the tape measure.

· Hold the level parallel to the ground and measure the distance from the roof’s surface to the level’s 12- inch mark.
· Make sure you rotate the tape so it is perpendicular to the level. Write down the rise.

5. Calculate the roof’s slope. 

The number you measured with the tape is the roof’s rise or pitch — the amount the roof’s height rises over 12 horizontal inches. For example, if you measured 3 inches, the roof’s ratio will be a 3:12 pitch. (See illustration).

Monitor & protect your booth 24-hours a day

For anyone who has ever visited our blog, you have already seen a lot of posts about safety. It’s something we take very seriously in the business we’re in…. and we’re hoping you do too.

We KNOW just how dangerous mixing rooms and commercial paint spray booths can be! They comprise of highly flammable liquids, which creates an environment where fire is always a threat. Fumes accumulate, chemicals leak or spill…. if any ignition source is introduced it becomes a potentially devastating combination.

When a fire occurs, systems must be instantaneously shut off and alarms and other electrical devices must be activated in order to save as much property and lives as possible. This type of explosion doesn’t always happen during usage, when someone is there to shut it off manually. What would you do if this happened in the middle of the night? Would you find your shop burned to the ground in the morning?

That’s where a fire suppression system becomes an important component of a spray booth system. (In many cases, this type of system is mandated by local municipalities, and must be installed in your spray booth.)

Generally, a paint booth fire suppression system includes dry chemical tanks that are discharged when heat-sensitive fuses are broken. In the event if a fire, when any one of the fuses break, tensioned cables are released which punctures a C02 canister, thus releasing a chemical fire retardant through nozzles positioned throughout the paint booth and sometimes parts of the exhaust stack. A manual trigger, located at the personnel entrance to the spray booth, allows a user to trigger the system from outside the booth. Other electrical components of the spray booth system may be deactivated when the system is triggered, such as the fan or AMU. The best part, fire suppression systems monitors your paint booth 24-hours a day.

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